Author Topic: GS500 Classic Trials Project  (Read 15889 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Michael Leete

  • Club Members
  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2018, 12:42:04 pm »
Not far from you http://findit.lutontoday.co.uk/company/438362906423297

As well as rads they have done two tanks for me. Soldered one on my Dellow and welded one on Austin Seven.

Michael

Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2018, 01:21:22 pm »
Thanks Michael; I'll look into them, they're not far from me.  I'm currently awaiting a reply from the ThreeBond Technical department on their product ThreeBond TB1184, though, soldering is probably going to give a stronger bond.

Offline Stephen Bailey

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 467
  • AKA: Ratty.
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2018, 07:36:06 pm »
Yes it really is, considering the vibration and flex that will happen to it.
Posts by myself are personal posts and in no way are an official expression of the MCC. or the MCC Committee.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_3KP7X8RQ4

Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2018, 10:46:00 pm »
Had to tackle a job Iíve been putting off for a while; removing the front engine bolt that is seized in the crankcase.  The GS500 engine is prone to this problem due to all the crap that gets thrown up from the front wheel and the electrolytic reaction that occurs between the steel bolt and the alloy crankcase.  If left to progress too far, the corrosion expands sufficiently to break off the lug from the crankcase.  Youíre pretty well stuffed then :(.


Fig. 1 Front engine bolt seized in crankcase

Fortunately, the bolt doesnít contact the crankcase for the whole width of the engine, just the lug at each end.  The first thing to do was remove the middle section of the bolt so I could deal with each lug separately.  That process involved drilling through the bolt at two points (I couldn't get a grinder in the space), then very gentle use of a chisel to remove a 25 mm section.


Fig. 2 Underside showing where bolt is to be divided

Next, cut off the exposed parts of the bolt, drill along the length of the bolt at each, collapse each part of the bolt, then gently tap out with a punch :-\.


Fig.3 Engine bolt cut and drilled


Crankcase cleared of bolt; a very big sigh of relief :D!!


Fig. 4 Engine bolt removed and crankcase still intact

The remains of the bolt is now a collection of short pieces.



Fig. 5 Remains of engine bolt

Petrol tank is at the repairers; thanks Michael.



Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #34 on: August 08, 2018, 07:26:12 pm »
I could do with some advice .  I'm almost in the position where I can strip the project down and paint the frame. Total headache time  :-\!  I want to brush paint the frame with a paint that will give me the most resilient finish; I'm working to a budget here (apparently)!  Powder coating is out; I don't think this is the most suitable medium for this bike, mainly as I might end up welding the odd bracket here and there.

I've had a trawl through the internet, but haven't come up with a definitive solution.  There are products from Manor Coating Systems, from POR15, from PJ1, yacht paints, etc.  There are different primers and top coats.  My head's spinning  :'(.  I could do with some advice based on practical experience.  Oh, and the colour has to be blue  :D

And to add to the quandary. I have the aluminium alloy yokes that need painting silver, or polishing, then coating in a lacquer.  I know I could just polish the alloy yokes to a lovely finish, but I'm not renowned for cleaning bikes so that finish would soon dull to a corroded flat.

I'll service my bikes to the nth degree and replace iffy parts, but life's to short for cleaning; takes up valuable riding time.

Anyway, any suggestions on paint?

Offline Simon Woodall

  • Administrator
  • Jr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 86
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #35 on: August 09, 2018, 10:07:30 am »
Hammerite?

Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #36 on: August 09, 2018, 01:06:35 pm »
I've never managed to achieve satisfactory results with Hammerite; that could be down to me  ::)

Offline Alastair Queen

  • Club Members
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 84
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #37 on: August 09, 2018, 03:37:59 pm »
I realise this is probably unprofessional, not the done thing, contrary to the sagest of advice, etc...probably a something-ist as well, but....I suggest looking at the paints Lidl sell?  They do an 'anti-rust' paint which I have found to be very difficult to remove...even with a too-powerful pressure washer...unlike other chassis paints, 'ammerite, etc.

They also used to sell aerosols, but with lidl, like Aldi, the stock problem is, one has to 'wait' until the offer comes round again?  Might be worth popping into one's local store, see if they have a ny tins left? Colour may not be an option, but, hey.....it's either, protection, or pretty? Take's yer pick eh?

Baufix is the maker, I believe?

Offline Stephen Bailey

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 467
  • AKA: Ratty.
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #38 on: August 09, 2018, 06:53:15 pm »
Use Cellulose. Still available. Quick drying. Fairly corrosion resistant. Sorted. :)
Posts by myself are personal posts and in no way are an official expression of the MCC. or the MCC Committee.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_3KP7X8RQ4

typhoondave

  • Guest
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #39 on: August 11, 2018, 08:28:43 pm »
A few years ago I used Japlac enamel paint with really good results on a Matchless frame and oil tank with the best results being achieved by making sure the tin had been kept in a warm place. (Shouldn't be a problem this time of year). This way the brush marks disappeared to leave a lovely gloss finish.
More recently I've used Rustoleum paint, again with really good results and easy to use. I don't think you'd be disappointed with either of these and a much better choice than Hammerite where no two batches are manufactured the same-fact!

Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #40 on: August 14, 2018, 07:35:15 am »
I collected the fuel tank from Auto Radiators of Luton.  Well pleased with the result :).  The new plate I fabricated for the petrol tap, I fitted with two counter-sunk, stainless steel, M6 rivet nuts.

   
Fig 1 Blanking plate soldered over previous tap aperture                Fig 2 New petrol tap plate soldered into position

Iíd recommend Auto Radiators for any tank or radiator repairs.  They had loads of stuff in for repair, including petrol tanks for a Ford Capri and an old military Land Rover.  Interestingly, they sealed the insides of petrol tanks with POR15.  Theyíre at 141 Portland Road, LU4 8AY, if you need them.

Iím still looking into the paint for the frame.  Thanks to everyone who came up with suggestions; all been very helpful.

Offline Stephen Bailey

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 467
  • AKA: Ratty.
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #41 on: August 14, 2018, 01:01:41 pm »
As regards the paint..... Make sure it is petrol proof.
Posts by myself are personal posts and in no way are an official expression of the MCC. or the MCC Committee.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_3KP7X8RQ4

Offline Paul K

  • Club Members
  • Sr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 418
  • Paul Khambatta
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #42 on: August 15, 2018, 08:22:17 am »
Paint decision time :-\.  I've ordered some Rust-Oleum CombiColor in cans for the frame (blue) and the engine bars (black).  According to the data sheet; this product serves as a primer and top coat all in one; and it can be applied on bare and manually derusted steel. The preparation instructions state remove rust scale, loose mill scale, loose rust and loose coatings by scraping and wire brushing; sand intact coatings to roughen the surface slightly.  So on paper it looks good :).

The cellulose paint would've been a good choice for suitability; the application was the drawback. I didn't want to use aerosol  cans because the paint spray mist goes everywhere and my garage is small and full of other stuff, including bikes.  I'd have to cover a lot of stuff up :(.

The Aldi/Lidl products can be good, but as stated earlier, if you need another can, you can be a long time waiting. Their product is manufactured by Beaufix so there are places selling it on-line.

I was talking to my local paint supplier and the guy reckoned that Hammerite was not as good as in the past; I got the impression that probably all the good ingredients, that would be the pathogens and carcinogens, had been removed. International, another good manufacturer had been bought up by Dulux and the name put in mothballs.

Offline Alastair Queen

  • Club Members
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 84
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #43 on: August 15, 2018, 12:51:34 pm »
International, another good manufacturer had been bought up by Dulux and the name put in mothballs.

Ooooh! International moth balls?    :)

Offline Stephen Bailey

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 467
  • AKA: Ratty.
Re: GS500 Classic Trials Project
« Reply #44 on: August 15, 2018, 10:27:47 pm »
International still do paint. (Marine applications).
Posts by myself are personal posts and in no way are an official expression of the MCC. or the MCC Committee.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_3KP7X8RQ4