Author Topic: Cheap and easy road book reader  (Read 7017 times)

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Offline Jason Potts

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Cheap and easy road book reader
« on: October 29, 2016, 03:55:33 pm »
My take on a cheap and easy road book reader for anyone who has never made one before.  :P

This is just the basic road book reader for now, the addition of lights, a switch and other finessing will come later.

I started off with the basic parts shown in pic 1 which are :-

1) a plastic pencil box from Tesco (currently retailing at £1.50)
2) 2-off 10inch lengths of 15mm copper tube. (but cut these to suit your own box size).
3) 2-off 15mm rubber walking stick ends from Wilco's (currently retailing at £0.60 each).
4) 2-off penny washers.
5) 2-off wood screws (I used self tappers because that's all I had).

I drilled 4-off 14mm holes, two in each end of the box as shown in pic 2. I warmed up one end of the copper tube and pushed it through one of the holes, through the box, and though the hole opposite. By doing this it provides a tight fitting hole over the tube that also has a nice level of resistance when you turn the tube. did this again with the other tube, test fitted the walking stick ends and it looked like pic 3.



I made up a couple of bits of wood (pic 4) covered them with epoxy glue and shoved them in the ends of the copper tubes. As the walking stick ends wernt that tight on the tubes I wrapped the tube ends with some black tape. (pic 5) this makes the walking stick rubbers a much tighter fit when pushed on. When the glue was dry I cut the wooden plugs level and drilled a pilot hole down the middle so that the screws wouldn't split the plugs. (see pic 6).



pic 7 shows the rubber walking stick ends, self tappers and washers assembled on the tubes. The washers ensure that the tubes dont come out along with your route instructions when an adjustment is being made whilst simultaneously bouncing up a potholed lane.  ::)

pic 8 shows the tubes assembled in the box minus the lid and pic 9 shows the basic box complete with lid and sample literature installed.



can also be used as a low tech tablet.  ;D


Things to note:

1) clean off any burrs from around the holes where the tubes pass through.
2) Don't drill your holes too close to the top of the box or you wont get our lid on.
3) the box I used was slightly narrower than a piece of A4 paper so I had to trim it down its length slightly.

that's all thanks.  ;)
 

   

Offline Paul K

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2016, 10:08:24 pm »
A neat bit of kit.  You can back-light with some LED strip lights.  Jon Robb gave me a length (of strip light that is) after he'd installed the same on his route holder.  Light-weight and reliable.  Must confess, I've still not got around to fitting it.

Offline Paul K

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2016, 08:57:07 am »
Just a thought; are you aware that the trial route can be downloaded from the club as a Word doc? This gives you the opportunity to tailor the route to your requirements.  In my case, that involves deleting columns I don't need, increasing the font size and numbering the directions. As time has passed and my vision has become more long-sighted, the font size has gone from 12 to 14 and now 16 point. The overall length can now run from 15 to 20 pages of A4, which can be a tight squeeze in my route holder and that's on 6 mm diameter spindles  :o.

Offline Jason Potts

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2016, 08:13:31 pm »
that's good intel thanks.

20 pages WOW  :o

'Operation Back Light' to follow

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #4 on: January 04, 2017, 09:12:23 pm »
Put the winder knobs both on the left hand side.

Then you can wind on and back with ease without taking yer right hand off the throttle and near the front brake.


Offline Tim Kingham

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2017, 04:05:57 pm »
I have been doing the MCC Trials since mid sixties I am lucky that I don't need glasses for distance but only for reading I have an illuminated tupper-ware box with lights my only mod is to take the word document and cut and enlarge the font so I can read it  without glasses in A4 it squeezes a few columns but readable
It sits in two rolls before and after mid break of trial  I selo-tape the pages together on the floor in a strip and cover the strip with transparent Fablon even if it gets wet it wont disintegrate

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2017, 04:09:55 pm »
use Scotch Magic Tape to tape a couple of lines down the back of the route as well as taping together...

Magic tape is waterproof....

Offline Mark Gregg

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2018, 07:40:03 am »
In the interests of supporting those using word documents etc what font style do you prefer.  every little helps :)

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #8 on: November 21, 2018, 11:33:40 am »
In the interests of supporting those using word documents etc what font style do you prefer.  every little helps :)

Well I prefer no Margins or boxes or lines.... Makes it  much easier to put into plain text.

As fer Font I always re-Morph the whole book using Arial, deleting unwanted information and instructions.

The main text into 18 pt.

Section Headings in 20 pt.

And "Restarts" in 24 pt. in Bold, Highlighted and with Big Stars each side. :)

Offline rick howell

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2018, 09:47:22 am »
I'm up with Ratty there;

for me I find that first of all simplify the directions - for example I don't bother about mileometer resetting and use the full A4 width.


 I use a larger font (16 Arial) before breakfast stop and marginally smaller after (14 Arial), red print RESTART in bold next to sections that are restarts for me, and leave a space for writing/drawing in timed tests instructions and sketch.

I backlight my box with strip leds that are controllable to keep the light levels down when you don't need to read the thing - such as in the sections as you'll know what to do before you begin the section, right? Too bright can really disturb your night vision.

Rick

Offline Tony Bishop

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2018, 07:30:14 pm »
I know I am going a little "off piste" here but all the talk of modifying the route card begs the question " is the route card fit for purpose" ?
I have long felt that there are several issues here and I suspect this may have been aired in the past but personally I find the route card far too long winded with too much information.
I suspect that this is because the route card was originally produced in it's current format by car members and written primarily with car members in mind. This isn't a criticism of you car boys, just an observation that you have a second pair of eyes to do the reading and some of you are ensconced in a nice dry cocoon.
As an example, at a junction with a road sign, the wording might go as follows: L at dp Exeter, Honiton, Newton Abbot
Why do we need every town listed on the dp when the first would be sufficient ?
The other thing I dislike is the columns. What are they for ? Does anyone write in them ? To me they are just so much waste of space, make the number of sheets excessive which in turn means more "twiddling" of the rollers when I would rather be watching where I am going.
Finally, and I know this is a heresy, but what is wrong with the tulip system of route finding ? I have ridden several other LDTs which use this excellent system and so far I have never gone astray.
There is a good engineering adage which the MCC route card could adopt "less is more".

Offline Paul K

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #11 on: November 25, 2018, 08:45:49 am »
In the interests of supporting those using word documents etc what font style do you prefer.  every little helps :)
Probably doesnít matter too much if youíre reasonably savvy with Word.  I know enough to manipulate the MCC document for my purposes.  I delete the total mileage column and have now increased the font to 22 point as Iíve got more long-sighted.

Iíve also created a tulip-style version for one of the trials as I found the symbols were easier to read than text. It just takes a lot longer to produce the first one :(.  Subsequent events more or less follow the same route so I can amend the original :).

I make a point of retaining all the 'QQ' areas :-X.


Fig 1 Text version



Fig 2 Tulip-style version

The mileages on my routes are converted to km because that's what the speedo was calibrated in unfortunately :(.

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #12 on: November 25, 2018, 06:47:09 pm »
For some reason. Tulip Routes always seem to confuse me.....

The last time I entered the Ilkley Trial I Morphed the route back into word.  :D

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #13 on: November 25, 2018, 06:49:58 pm »
Oh. And by the way Acerbis no longer make their manual Routebook holder. They discontinued it about five years ago.

The only decent ones I have found are made by TouratechÖ.

Perhaps there are others if a member wants a ready made one....

Offline Jason Potts

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Re: Cheap and easy road book reader
« Reply #14 on: December 01, 2018, 05:45:57 pm »
Images on my initial post now reinstalled. dam you photobucket  >:(...  hello Imgur  ;)

I'm going to make a mark II using an aluminium electrical box I bought from Maplins before they shut down. I'll post some images of that soon.