Author Topic: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials  (Read 346 times)

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Offline Paul K

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Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« on: February 19, 2019, 10:51:22 am »
A member in Germany has asked: ‘who would be best to contact with questions about which car to prepare for classic trials? Looking for something like MG Midget or Ford Escort, Austin A40?’

On the assumption that the club membership has the expertise :), could you offer your opinions, i.e. advantages, disadvantages, availability, competitiveness, etc.

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2019, 01:05:01 pm »
A Ford Escort to be competitive really needs a 1600 engine at 100bhp plus. And Jacked up a bit. also needs a Fack or similar Strong Diff put in.

A Midget needs to be well tuned (1275 or 1500) jacked up with a stronger diff. An Austin A40 Uses the same engine and drive train as a 1275 Midget so the above applies also.


I campaigned a 1275 Midget many years ago and always took two spare diffs and half shafts plus equipment to change them. This only added to the weight and sold it after only a year and a half. (Bought a Beach Buggy).  :)

I also used a 1300 Escort for a year until the MK 2 Midge was ready. Totally under powered. hence a 1600 needed.

Possibly someone that still trials one of these cars may have more modern solutions, however the dwindling numbers of these cars competing shows that other cars are possibly better and or cheaper, unless you are prepared to put a lot of effort, modification and cost into such a vehicle.

Those that are still successfully competing may look fairly standard but are well modified and tuned.

I somehow think that the German TUV or such regulations will get in the way if being built in Germany.

Hope this helps.

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2019, 01:07:18 pm »
Would not there be a fair few 1600 VW Beetles around in Germany?


Offline Thomas von Kreisler

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2019, 07:48:28 am »
Hello

There are some Beetles around but I was thinking of a BMC A driven car like the Midget as I have one since 30 years now and I know these cars quite well and I have a lot of parts....
Do even the Peter May driveshafts brake?
I thought a Midget with 1500 springs and a good sump would be good as a starting point?

Offline Simon Woodall

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2019, 01:45:57 pm »
A Midget would be the best of the options, and Yes 1500 springs would be a good idea.   You need to get a much ground clearance as you can get away with.    You might consider 14" wheels if the TUV will let you.  These would be legal in Class O, but not in Class 5.
14" wheels would impact the gearing, but this can be solved with a lower final drive (slow on the road), or more power (more fun all round).   A bash plate under the sump is a necessity, and ensure that the exhaust is as tight to the bottom of the car as possible and is routed up and over the rear axle then straight out the back of the car, not the type that goes across.

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2019, 11:07:26 am »
The exhaust on my Midget ended up going through the rear of the front wing and down the side of the sill....  :)

You can put it inside the sill if you so wish....

Offline Stephen Bailey

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Re: Which Car To Prepare For Classic Trials
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2019, 11:10:12 am »
Oh and you might need a bungee cord round the gear lever to the bulkhead to stop it jumping out of first.   :)