MCC Forum

Technical Topics => Car Help => Topic started by: Paul K on April 11, 2020, 07:48:35 am

Title: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on April 11, 2020, 07:48:35 am
I started this topic after a request to write up the rebuild of my Citroen Dyane three-wheeler.  The car was eventually sold on within the Club, somewhat reluctantly, but I realised that I preferred motorcycles so the three-wheeler would probably just end up sat in the drive slowly deteriorating.

I first saw the three-wheeler competing in one of the MCC trials and stopped to have a chat with the crew.  It looked a lot of fun.  Sometime later, the car was advertised in NOTW so I thought, ‘Worth a look’.

There were a number of reasons to consider buying it, one of which was the opportunity to take my late dad, 86-years old at that time, on an MCC trial.  For a number of years, he’d come along to the start at Popham to see the bikes, cars and me off.  Here was the ideal opportunity.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409638_6bd62781c2_z.jpg)
Point of purchase – an opportunity beckons.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272747_414de1a5bf.jpg)
Point of purchase – rear end scrapes

The three-wheeler was based on a Citroen Dyane, essentially a 2CV with a different body.  The 2CV has 602 cc horizontally-opposed, twin-cylinder air-cooled engine with oil cooler.  The front suspension is a long travel soft leading-link arrangement.  The rear suspension identical, but trailing link.  There’re 15 inch wheels; and the engine weight and clutch is well in front of the driven wheels.  Front discs are inboard so should avoid the worst of the mud and also reduces unsprung weight. The gearbox is a four speed, though, it’s really a three speed with a manual overdrive

All good stuff for a trials car.  And spares are readily available.

There was some damage to the underside that I was aware and that needed some welding; about £100 I reckoned.  So I purchased the car; to be collected later.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409763_f8358a2fb1_z.jpg)
Horizontally opposed twin 602 cc and sealed beam headlamps.

My dad and me caught the train from Paddington to Cornwall, from where I drove the car to London to drop my dad off, then I carried on to Hertfordshire.  That was a bloody long day, though, lots of smiles from people.  We overtook one car, but only so they could pull alongside us immediately after for the passenger to take a photograph.

Once home, I got a quote for the welding work; I’d grossly under-estimated the expense.  It would cost about £490.  That’s when the restoration started.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755935986_f7e5437395_z.jpg)
Chassis damage – gouge and dent in the floor.  The two bolts secure one side of the rear axle.

The first step was to drive the car up to my son’s place.  I had no room for a rebuild and he had a large garden.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272872_87f13fd4a9.jpg)
Car in my son’s garden.  Those seats looked heavy and weren’t adjustable fore and aft.

A look at the work involved in dismantling the car.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272822_fb9b45bceb_z.jpg)
Front of engine compartment – original condition.  The single coil gives the ignition system a lost spark system if I remember correctly.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409758_d6ef51a5d6_z.jpg)
Front bulkhead – original condition.  All original Citroen electrics.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755936041_c92e646942_z.jpg)
Steering intermediate shaft and gear change – original condition.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409703_e6ecee55c4_z.jpg)
Battery and wiper motor – original condition.  The motor was a Lucas unit.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409663_13966c3946_z.jpg)
Pedals and steering column – original condition.  The passenger compartment was lined with plywood so that had to go as part of a weight-saving exercise.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272712_c5280ca1be_z.jpg)
Rear compartment with fuel tank – original condition.  The fuel filler with the chrome cap was no longer in use.

In theory, removing the bits from the chassis should be reasonably straightforward.  In theory, it is.  In practice, it is not (as anyone who has done this will tell you).  Bolts are rusted solid (get out the grinder), bolt heads rounded off (grind a socket flat and bash it on with a hammer), thin suspension nuts immoveable (hammer and chisel) and so the list goes on.  This is also when you find the bits that are unserviceable or worn sufficiently that you might as well replace them now as do the job again later. 
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul Wheatley on April 11, 2020, 03:04:17 pm
That looks “fun” to put to rights and brings back certain memories.......of other people’s terrible “bodgeries”.

My first kit car was a Dutton Phaeton which I bought about thirty years ago when I was still in the RAF. It had successfully gone through eight previous MOTs. In retrospect, I have no idea how. I ran it for about a year before getting posted away to a “trouble spot” in the early 90s, so it had to be taken off the road for about eight months. When I returned I needed it to commute in but it had developed terrible electrical problems. I then discovered that who ever built it had wired it up before fitting the body and the latter was sitting on the main harness and it had finally expired. I realised the body had to come off.....

It resulted in a total rebuild, involving taking the very rusty chassis back to bare metal for a full repaint and some structural welding was needed. I reckon it took more time to fix it than to build a new one from scratch. I worked 18 hours a day for almost a month to get it back on the road and it almost cost me my marriage!

The car was far better when I’d finished it. However, I didn’t get the benefit because the RAF, in its wisdom, posted me shortly afterwards to another station where I didn’t need to commute.  ::) I couldn’t afford to keep it idle so I had to sell it. At least someone got the benefit but I lost a small fortune on it.

I found that building my Liege, years later, was a relative breeze.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on April 13, 2020, 08:58:45 pm
hey Paul, that looked rely good. I much prefer that aluminium look to the standard Lomax, think the Lomax can look a bit plastic'y. Yours looked very purposeful.

Thanks for putting some words down, I've enjoyed reading that. I find these 2cv's very interesting from a design and trails perspective. I've always been drawn to 3 wheelers for some reason (I might be a bit mad) and the 2cv seems to be an easy conversion.

Did you do any trials in it? how did it perform? how good are 3 wheels for LDT's

I've attached a link below to the Lomax build manual if anyone else feels a bit 'one wheel short of a trails car'.

https://www.sportsandleisurecars.co.uk/linked/223_build_manual_pdf.pdf

Anyone else with 3 wheel experiences please feel free to add some comments. thanks.

Also see below 2CV manual link.

http://asektionen.citroenklubben.com/www/Repair%20Manual%20No.%208161.pdf



Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on April 14, 2020, 08:02:48 am
Yeah, I did a few MCC trials in it with a variety of navigators; the best one was my youngest daughter.

Three wheels is absolute fun ;D.  Performance on the sections was no worse and no better than the four wheels I've done the trials on.  I don’t remember running out of power in the sections and we always kept up with most of the cars on the road.  The suspension was brilliant; low unsprung weight, long travel and you could adjust the ride height.  The limiting factor on raising the ride height was that the kingpin inclination would get nearer 90 degrees so self-centring could be affected; not that I ever raised it to extremes.

We lacked grip at times, though, that could be driver technique and, in hindsight, I probably ran the front tyre pressures too high :(.  Overtakes weren’t a regular thing, which you look forward to and enjoy when you usually ride a motorcycle :D.

The driving experience was a laugh ;D.  There was no anti-roll bar so it would lean well over on the bends.  The crew had to lean towards the inside of a bend; a bit like a sidecar outfit.  The two front wheels would follow the ruts in the track the same as a car or sidecar outfit, but the rear wheel, being in the centre, didn’t know where to go.  Consequently, you were correcting the steering, especially on tracks and roads with grass in the middle ;).

By coincidence there was a TV show on rebuilding a 2CV last night called ‘Car SOS’ (episode10, series 7), which went into a lot of detail of the design.  It was on channel More4 so worth a watch if you can catch it again.  It featured 2CV City, which was the company I got most of my parts from; a good bunch of people.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on April 18, 2020, 11:12:21 pm
Ready for the strip down.  Bonnet removed.  The seats looked heavy and weren’t adjustable fore and aft so they had to be replaced if possible, but that was in the future.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272787_4de2553878_z.jpg)
Engine ready to be removed


(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755936011_043d91c517_z.jpg)
Empty engine compartment

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272832_dbea82bcfe_z.jpg)
Gearbox with inboard disc brakes free.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755936006_5ee1a126ab_z.jpg)
Detaching the body.  The horizontal suspension cylinders can be seen on either side of the chassis.

Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Andy Hutchings on April 19, 2020, 09:30:10 am
I have distant memories of these cars being sold as a "Lomax" car in the 1990s, but my memory might be playing tricks. Apparently they were sold as 3-wheelers, but there was a disagreement with the D.V.L.A. as to what vehicle classification they should be, since all the chasses were originally Citroën 2CV ones, and were FOUR wheelers!
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on April 19, 2020, 07:32:52 pm
I'm really enjoying this post Paul. I did watch that car SOS program. Very good. Seems like if you can get those suspension units off without the grinder you're laughing.

Theres a chap on YouTube as well that's posted his Lomax renovation project.

Seen them come up on eBay every now and then but even scrappers fetch strong money.

If I was going to go down the car route again I would definitely be looking at one of these. We'll see what happens after I've moved into the new house.

Not given up on the bikes yet though.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on April 24, 2020, 10:15:23 am
Eventually the body was released from the chassis  :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272807_848cb6ebf7_z.jpg)
Body removed and a happy workforce (my son and my dad)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755936071_910ac15c2e_z.jpg)
Chassis strip down starts.  Suspension and axles waiting to be removed

Those suspension nuts were rusted on tight.  They were soaked in WD40, but a hammer and chisel moved them in the end ;)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755935911_815832eca4_z.jpg)
Rusted suspension cylinder nuts.  The horizontally-mounted damper unit has already been removed.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on May 07, 2020, 11:26:42 am
I stumbled upon this photo of a Blackjack Avion three-wheeler, crewed by Roger and Tania Beaumont, having a go on the Exeter Trial in 2009 at Fingle.  I think it originally appeared in Triple.  Looks like they've run out of grip.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49866406972_37b0a74d39_z.jpg)

Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Tim Kingham on May 07, 2020, 09:11:51 pm
Its the grass in the middle leading to sections that seem to catch the single back wheel guys stoney sections are not so bad
(Bit like me when I tried to use a Honda Transalp  I had to walk it to some sections and then once on the rocks it flew up!)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul Wheatley on May 07, 2020, 11:05:41 pm
Someone used to trial a Morgan 3 wheeler. It’s rear wheel drive seemed to take advantage of the undisturbed centre part of some sections. Obviously with fwd the single rear wheel has to be dragged through the mud and long grass etc.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Simon Woodall on May 13, 2020, 03:08:44 pm
Quote
Someone used to trial a Morgan 3 wheeler
Morgan Three wheelers have been associated with the MCC since before the First World War.
There have been a couple in Class O in recent years, but the true modern exponent of that type of machine has to be Tony Divey who trialed a Triking - Sort of Morgan-esque three wheeler powered by a Moto-Guzzi Vee Twin.
He seemed to do OK, but never really troubled the engraver.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on May 15, 2020, 09:30:51 am
Here’s two shots of a Triking.  The top photo is Tony Divey driving.
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49896995386_57578c708a_z.jpg)

This is on the Lands End
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49897306102_b7d6d5fdac_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul Wheatley on May 15, 2020, 03:30:30 pm
All rear wheel drive.

Anything in the rules to prevent reversing up?  :D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on May 16, 2020, 09:01:58 am
I'm guessing there's nothing in the rules stopping you from using a 4.00 - 18 trials tyre on the rear either.   :o  that is if I'm right in thinking you use the 18"  moto-guzzi rear wheel.

I saw one of these with a BMW r1200 engine up front once. It was in a custom show at the ally pally. Very nice. 8)

So for climbing up sections do we think this arrangement is better or worse than a 2cv front wheel drive three wheeler?
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on May 21, 2020, 06:16:34 pm
So for climbing up sections do we think this arrangement is better or worse than a 2cv front wheel drive three wheeler?
Probably six of one and half a dozen of the other.  Only one driven wheel at the rear with, hopefully, a fair bit of weight on it, or two driven wheels at the front with, hopefully, enough weight.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on May 21, 2020, 06:22:17 pm
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409858_24780ed2fd_z.jpg)
Suspension and new floor on chassis

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755935966_f495667a54_z.jpg)
Body on chassis.  Not sure if my Dad's catching his breathe or slacking.

The steering mechanism was an unpleasant surprise :(.  The UJ on the bottom of the intermediate shaft was worn, but a closer look showed that the yoke on the UJ had got the wrong number of splines for the steering rack :o.  The splines on the steering rack were different from the splines on the intermediate shaft.  So, you could say that it was only the tension in the clamping bolt and a few splines that may have lined up that were keeping the two connected :(. 

Luckily, there was a Citroen specialist, The Chevronic Centre, around the corner from me and the guy who owned it was a fount of knowledge.  He reckoned the intermediate shaft was modified from an Ami 6 (40 splines), but the 2CV steering rack has 26 splines.  F
So from a container packed with old Citroen spares, he sold me an intermediate shaft from a GS (26 splines) and out of the two shafts, I had the UJ replaced and ended up with an intermediate shaft that would fit the steering column and the steering rack.  That was a relief! ;D

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49775616368_d2dfb69714_z.jpg)
Incorrect flange ???

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49776478127_1af696c7c8_c.jpg)
Intermediate shaft

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49776478142_3bdeedb435_z.jpg)
Rubber mounted steering column
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 21, 2020, 06:42:13 pm
Going well.  :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on May 22, 2020, 08:49:58 am
Loving this, this is better than watching Ed China.

Well done Paul.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 22, 2020, 10:39:02 am
Loving this, this is better than watching Ed China.

Ed China?
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on May 22, 2020, 04:34:19 pm
He's the mechanic on wheeler dealers.

Your dad looks winded, you've been working him to hard. Looks like he needs resuscitating with hot cup of tea and a bourbon.  ;)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 22, 2020, 06:48:14 pm
Loving this, this is better than watching Ed China.

Ed China?

Cheers.....  :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on May 22, 2020, 08:59:07 pm
Do you think that the club would ever accept trikes in? That is, a three wheel motorcycle just rider no passenger.

I guess you would have to insist on no solid axles like those ATV's use.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 22, 2020, 09:45:14 pm
Trikes were mentioned about ten years ago.

The three wheeler rules are that the passenger must sit alongside
the driver. However vehicles have entered that do not conform to that.

This is one for the Committee.

Quads have had a class in at least one trial recently.

Tho not specified if one, two, or Four wheel drive.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on May 23, 2020, 08:32:24 am
Im not asking for any rule changes, it was just a hypothetical question. I was skimming through eBay I saw a v8 powered monster that was as long as a bus with ape hanger bars etc. Thought it would be funny to see that trying to get up simms.  ;D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 23, 2020, 11:47:07 am
Im not asking for any rule changes, it was just a hypothetical question. I was skimming through eBay I saw a v8 powered monster that was as long as a bus with ape hanger bars etc. Thought it would be funny to see that trying to get up simms.  ;D

 :D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on May 23, 2020, 06:46:20 pm
A guy I worked with some years ago was building a trike from a motorcycle (can’t remember what model it was) with a VW beetle front axle grafted onto the front end.  The handlebars were connected by a linkage to the steering box. His stumbling block at the time was designing a handbrake to fit, but that would’ve been easy enough, using a car’s rear caliper on the bike’s rear wheel.  It looked a pretty neat idea; no knowledge if it was ever completed.

It had potential for MCC trials, but no class to enter in because the rider and pillion were not sat next to each other.  The arrangement would have been a three-wheeled quad bike!
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 24, 2020, 10:51:57 am
I think there is a case to be made for a Quad or Trike Class.

As an extension to the motorcycle classes.   :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Simon Woodall on May 24, 2020, 12:15:44 pm
Quote
Your dad looks winded, you've been working him to hard. Looks like he needs resuscitating with hot cup of tea and a bourbon

McVitie's or Jack Daniels?
 :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on May 24, 2020, 01:52:44 pm
Quote
Your dad looks winded, you've been working him to hard. Looks like he needs resuscitating with hot cup of tea and a bourbon

McVitie's or Jack Daniels?
 :)

 :D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 06, 2020, 03:27:35 pm
As the refurbishment continued, the original seats went back in as I didn’t have time to source and fit something else.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813078886_c4e5ea0ced_z.jpg)
Heavy seats

In March 2012, the car was rolling, but had no brakes, MoT, or various other not so minor details.  I had a chat with Neil Bray (of trialling fame) and he transported the car on his low loader up to my house and onto my drive.  The garage would have been the obvious choice, but no room.  At least I no longer felt guilty about using my son’s garden.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49755409868_591881938f_z.jpg)
Transported home

All the fiddly bits could be sorted out now that is was on my drive; not having to travelling 30 miles round trip to my son’s place saved a load of time.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49756272727_e707307ba9_z.jpg)
On the drive, luckily in nice weather
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 06, 2020, 04:24:23 pm
Looking good....
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 06, 2020, 04:24:50 pm
Could you not remove the head restraints?
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul Wheatley on June 06, 2020, 06:09:26 pm
That wouldn’t be advisable. There’s a sharp edge of the turtle deck behind them and what with the neck snapping acceleration of the mighty power plant.......
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 07, 2020, 07:15:41 am
You hit the nail on the head. Many's the time I've pulled the steering wheel off the column as that engine hit the sweet spot in the power band  ;)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 07, 2020, 02:47:06 pm
That wouldn’t be advisable. There’s a sharp edge of the turtle deck behind them and what with the neck snapping acceleration of the mighty power plant.......

 :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 07, 2020, 02:47:29 pm
You hit the nail on the head. Many's the time I've pulled the steering wheel off the column as that engine hit the sweet spot in the power band  ;)

Also...  :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 11, 2020, 10:52:43 am
The fuel supply pipe from the fuel tank was originally drawn out of the tank filler cap; in addition, the tank didn’t look to be as safe as it could be as it was held in under a leather strap :(

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813078946_70f7a5f7e9_z.jpg)
Fuel tank – original, but on a new base.

so I modified the tank with an integral supply pipe and a breather pipe; a length of tube to the fuel tank meant the fuel tank could now be replenished through the previously redundant filler on the body.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813078936_3314a2e201_z.jpg)
Fuel tank mods

Next was the air filter.  The original was a pancake type that was rattling to pieces and exposed to the elements.  By chance, I found a complete air filter from a Petter diesel engine at the side of the road; no idea how that came to be there, but it was ideal for what was needed.  That and some stainless steel tube and some convoluted tubing.  No dirt getting into those cylinders :)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813076706_3198eae015_z.jpg)
Air filter

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813381832_de60b925e8_z.jpg)
Air intake with convoluted tubing and an OEM elbow.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul Wheatley on June 11, 2020, 12:26:32 pm
Nothing satisfies a home mechanic like building a car from pieces found at the side of the road!  8)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 11, 2020, 01:18:28 pm
Nothing satisfies a home mechanic like building a car from pieces found at the side of the road!  8)

 :D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 19, 2020, 08:11:53 am
Nothing satisfies a home mechanic like building a car from pieces found at the side of the road!  8)
So what pieces have you found  :D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 19, 2020, 08:16:30 am
Carrying on with the build, the choke operating mechanism on the carburetter was worn, as was the roller on the accelerator pump.  Surprisingly, the butterfly spindles for the choke and throttle weren’t.  A new roller was fitted to the accelerator pump and a new choke cam fabricated, then epoxy-resined to the existing mechanism.  The new roller made a big difference to the engine’s performance; totally lost the flat spot ;D.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813381842_db320ff69f_z.jpg)
Choke lever repair with epoxy resin.

The electrical wiring was a nightmare; wires all over the place, crimp connectors, bits of insulating tape, and Citroen only seemed to use one colour; green!  Must have been a bulk purchase. Tracing the connections to produce a circuit diagram was partially successful.  There were some parts of the loom I never did trace :-\; I suspect there were soldered joints within the main loom that made point to point tracing difficult.

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49813078901_1e76c5c1ca_z.jpg)
Wiring nightmare :o
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on June 19, 2020, 08:32:40 pm
Quote
  Could you do a bit of a write up on your 2cv powered one please. Or just thoughts on three wheels in general.

When I asked you for a few words regards 3 wheelers Paul I didn't expect this level of info. Thanks for doing this I'm really enjoying reading about your up's and down's with this project.

I'm finally moving house next week. When I get settled and have built a shed I owe you a project writeup. Not sure what it will be yet though.  ::)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 21, 2020, 07:48:31 am
Quote
…… I owe you a project writeup. Not sure what it will be yet though.  ::)
Just give us all a write-up of them all  ;D
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Stephen Bailey on June 21, 2020, 02:31:19 pm
Quote
…… I owe you a project writeup. Not sure what it will be yet though.  ::)
Just give us all a write-up of them all  ;D

 :)
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on June 21, 2020, 05:22:05 pm
Going to have to buy something first. First time in my life I've not got a motorcycle. Seems very odd.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on June 23, 2020, 09:22:31 am
What about all those bikes you played about with.  Didn't you develop an MZ/CZ and a BSA?
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Jason Potts on June 23, 2020, 10:22:30 pm
All gone now. No where to keep it all at the new place. I've down sized. Once I've sold the old house I should be OK to build a new workshop at the new house and get something started. I'm thinking of something that fits in class c so I can ride round with Rick.

I'd love to have a car project but I have to be realistic, I think space constraints will prevent me from going down this avenue.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on July 01, 2020, 11:06:10 am
I think space constraints will prevent me from going down this avenue.
I know exactly what you mean.

Back on the three-wheeler build, we entered the Edinburgh 2012, reckoning we'd be finished in time.  By September the MoT was arranged for nine days before the Edinburgh :o.  The car passed, but there was a problem; the mechanical fuel pump gave up the ghost at the testing garage :-[.  They very kindly lent me an SU electric pump, which I jerry-rigged to get the car back home.  At least I had the MoT.  There was some frantic research and phone calls and a few days later I fitted a new Facet electric fuel pump :).

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Facet pump 60106

The new fuel pump was installed in the engine compartment so that the fuel line within the cabin was now on the scavenge side, not the pressure side.  That way, if the fuel pipe leaked or ruptured, the cabin wouldn’t fill up with petrol under pressure :o.  Well, some pressure, but only that from the force of gravity.

The Friday evening of the Edinburgh Trial 2012 arrived.  Me and my dad set off to the start at Tamworth.  The rain bucketed down, but we were kitted out in motorcycle gear and crash helmets so stayed dry.  We did manage to lose a wiper blade, fortunately it fell into one of the spare wheels so wasn’t lost. 

We failed scrutineering and weren’t allowed to start :-[.  I’d failed to read the regulations in the route card thoroughly and made some wrong assumptions.  I’d assumed three-wheelers fell under the ACU, totally and would be treated like an outfit.  No. We lacked a fire extinguisher, an oil spill kit and a reverse light.  An oil spill kit could be sorted out, but the rest not.  A cup of tea, then a dejected return home :(.
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on August 17, 2020, 07:49:26 am
So now to try the Exeter 2013 and get the car prepared properly.  Enquiries to the club produced some very helpful advice from chief scrutineer Barrie Kirton.  All the missing bits were sourced and fitted, together with improved, raised suspension at the rear.  My dad was forced to withdraw and, to be honest, the Exeter trial was probably going to be too long for him; he was also a rubbish navigator ::).  Lydia (my youngest daughter), stepped up and signed on as navigator :D.

On January 4th 2013, we were at Popham for the Exeter start.  The weather was mild, no rain and none predicted.  I think temperatures were about 12 degC, which is incredibly warm for that time of the year, though probably not now.  The car breezed through Sparkford scrutineering, though, there was a comment about the hot exposed exhaust headers, but that’s no different from a bike or an outfit. 

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Exeter Trial 2013 Haynes, Sparkford scrutineering, Barrie Kirton giving it the once-over
Title: Re: Citroen Dyane (2CV) Three-wheeler Build
Post by: Paul K on October 12, 2020, 08:34:14 am
Been a while, but I found time to load some more photos of the Exeter Trial 2013.  There was a special test at Sparkford and, surprisingly, that car could shift!  We flew through the special tests, cleaned some sections magnificently and we finished.  We both received our finishers’ certificates with relish.  For me, it had been a long time coming.  For Lydia, it was well deserved; she was an excellent navigator and had even got out and pushed the car out of some slippery conditions when needed.

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Exeter Trial 2013 Fingle on the escape road after failing

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Exeter Trial 2013 again; no idea what section